Sep 18, 2014

16 cryptids that might (or might not) exist

posted by Laura Domela

octo.png

Cryptozoology is the study of creatures whose existence has yet to be—or else cannot entirely be—proved or disproved by science. These creatures, known collectively as cryptids, include examples like the Loch Ness Monster, Bigfoot, and the Himalayan Yeti, yet these famous cases are by no means the only ones on record. In fact, practically every country and corner of the globe has its own legendary monster or mystery creature that supposedly dwells there, from giant bats in Java to enormous water hounds in Ireland.
via Mental Floss

Continue reading

Image: istock

Tags :    0 comments  
Sep 18, 2014

Engineers made a battery-free radio the size of an ant

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2014-09-17_at_5.45.02_PM.png

The tiny chips, which are powered by harvesting radio signals and don't require external power, are small enough to fit on gadgets in your home, but still powerful enough to send and receive transmissions. The hope, according to the creators, is for device-makers to start using the chips in gadgets for the Internet of Things. Add one of the chips to a lightbulb, and make your stuff a little a smarter — able to communicate with you and all the electronics around you.
via The Verge

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
Sep 18, 2014

"World's first" 3D printed car created and driven by Local Motors

posted by Larra Morris

local-motors-strati-imts.jpg

The acceleration of 3D printing means that even cars can be now printed. The Local Motors Strati 3D car was printed live at the International Manufacturing Technology Show (IMTS) 2014 last week. The printing process took just 44 hours.
via Gizmag

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
Sep 18, 2014

A robotic 3D printer could print anything, anywhere it wants

posted by Larra Morris

Screen_Shot_2014-09-17_at_5.38.37_PM.png

3D printers are far from a perfect technology at this point, but one of their most glaring issues is that their printing capacity is limited to the size of the machines. The print head on a 3D printer can only travel so far, which is why moving it onto a wheeled platform that's completely mobile is a brilliant idea, and could be quite a leap for the technology.

The 3&Dbot, developed by a bunch of industrial designers at NEXT and LIFE, still needs a flat surface to work on, but the size of a part or object it can create is almost limitless—with a large enough area to work.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Sep 17, 2014

Dremel announces personal 3D printer

posted by Laura Domela

dremel3d-4.jpg

Dremel, the company best known for its rotary power tool that's used for everything from routing and sanding to carving and engraving, has announced that it's taking a leap into the 21st century with its first consumer 3D printer – the Dremel 3D Idea Builder.
via Gizmag

Continue reading

Tags : 3D printing,    0 comments  
Sep 17, 2014

Traffic light shows people dancing in real time, makes crossing roads fun

posted by Laura Domela

 dancewalk.jpg

The concept was to provide a fun and safe way to prevent pedestrians from jaywalking—a dance room was set up on a square in Lisbon, Portugal, inviting the people from the public to enter into the box and dance. 

Their dance moves were captured and displayed on the nearby traffic lights in real time—it successfully made 81% more pedestrians stop and wait for the green light to come on before crossing. 

via Design Taxi

Continue reading 

Tags : transportation,    0 comments  
Sep 17, 2014

Scientists used a Hitchcock thriller to measure patients' consciousness

posted by Larra Morris

u0zhtexql5d0qa30d8v4.jpg

Alfred Hitchcock, our master of suspense, was incredibly good at manipulating his audience—a fact that has now come in handy for neuroscientists. When they screened a Hitchcock thriller for volunteers in a brain scanner, they found that brain activity of a man who has been in a vegetative state for 16 years was astonishingly similar to that of healthy, conscious people.

In the past few years, scientists have slowly inched toward communicating with brain-damaged patients who can't talk or walk but are minimally aware. Exactly how aware we never knew—until functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) revealed some remarkable results.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading 

Image: Hulton Archive/Getty

Tags :    0 comments  
Get this feed  
« Previous123456...679Next »

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register