Jan 28, 2013

Tesla Model S dubbed 'world's quickest production electronic vehicle' by NEDRA, runs 1/4 mile in 12 seconds

posted by Laura Domela

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We already knew the Tesla Model S was fast, but not this fast. After dropping a 12.371 quarter mile this past weekend at the Palm Beach International Raceway in Florida (@ 110.84 MPH), the National Electric Drag Racing Association awarded the Tesla Model S its stamp of officiation for being "the quickest production vehicle" in quarter mile tests. That's not just on a single pass, mind you, but several quarter mile runs over the course of a day at the track.
via Engadget

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Photo credit: Drag Times

Tags : EV, cars, automotive,    0 comments  
Jan 28, 2013

Intel’s mobile chips advance, but are still a tough sell

posted by Laura Domela

Intel came to rule the PC market by making the world’s most advanced chips, beating competitors down the curve of Moore’s Law and producing higher-performing processors at a lower unit cost.

But today’s smartphones and tablets don’t necessarily require cutting-edge computing performance, and investors are worried that Intel’s long-winning strategy won’t translate to profits as these devices cut into PC sales. Indeed, in the mobile market, Intel remains far behind its competitors.
via technology review

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Tags : chips, mobile,    0 comments  
Jan 28, 2013

XKCD comic inspires an entire password generator

posted by Laura Domela

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Passwords are something of a hot topic around here at DVICE, and password generators are nothing new. Though, most times they give us nothing more than more of the gibberish we already choose for our passwords. Web comic xkcd pointed this out in this pretty popular strip.

Joel Walters was among those who saw the comic. But while most folks saw it, chuckled and moved on, Walters decided to go ahead and create a password generator that uses the logic expressed therein.
via DVICE

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Image: Gizmodo

Tags : security,    0 comments  
Jan 28, 2013

How to save the electrical grid

posted by Laura Domela

Extreme storms such as Hurricane Sandy have pushed the U.S. electrical grid to its breaking point. The technology exists to keep the lights on—we just need to implement it.

The explosion lit up the Manhattan skyline. A sudden boom, a one-two punch of yellow light—then everything went black. After Hurricane Sandy shoved water into Con Edison’s 14th Street substation in October, causing electricity to arc between capacitors, about a quarter million customers were left in the dark. Video of the high-voltage spectacle quickly went viral: It became an early, brilliant symbol of the massive storm system’s most pervasive and inescapable affront—a total and lingering loss of power. Across the U.S., as far west as Indiana and from Maine to North Carolina, Sandy caused hundreds of other mass outages. A tree blown down, wires ravaged by wind, a flooded power facility—each event had rippled out to affect homes far from the point of failure. The blackouts continued for weeks afterward, thwarting the region’s recovery.
via Popular Science

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Tags : electricity,    0 comments  
Jan 28, 2013

Winning micro-housing design on display in NYC

posted by Laura Domela

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An exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York is showcasing the recently-announced winning entry from Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s adAPT micro-apartment design competition launched last July. "Making Room: New Models for Housing New Yorkers" – organized by the Citizens Housing & Planning Council and the Museum of the City of New York – opened on January 23rd and gives New Yorkers the opportunity to test drive some of the features destined for the winning "My Micro NY" development on East 27th Street scheduled for completion in September 2015.
via Gizmag

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Tags : architecture,    0 comments  
Jan 28, 2013

Five massive cooling towers collapsing in slow motion

posted by Laura Domela

Gavin Free of The Slow Mo Guys filmed five massive power plant cooling towers collapsing in slow motion. He shot the video at 350 frames per second on a Phantom Flex high-speed Digital camera.
via Laughing Squid 

Tags : for fun,    0 comments  
Jan 25, 2013

PBS profiles Martin Goetz, recipient of the first software patent

posted by Laura Domela

PBS has been exploring a fair bit technology history with its digital shorts lately -- examining the likes of animated GIFsindie games and coding as art in its Off Book series -- and it's now tackled one issue that's making more headlines than ever: software patents.
via Engadget

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Tags : people, software, patents,    0 comments  
Jan 25, 2013

Why experts think Twitter’s 6-second videos could be huge

posted by Laura Domela

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Tech journalists spent Thursday playing with, writing about, and reviewing Twitter’s clever and simple new system for video posts, Vine. But academics are keenly interested in Vine too, saying the extreme constraints it imposes on video could produce an explosion in video sharing.

There’s big potential in Vine, say the two experts in online socialization we spoke to, but it’s unclear how, and how often, people will use the six-second video service.

“My guess, given the enthusiasm for Twitter so far, is that people are going to do really cool things,” says Scott Klemmer, who co-directs the Human-Computer Interaction Group at Stanford University. “One of the things we know about creativity is that constraints are essential for getting people to do creative stuff. If you come up with the right constraints, that’s a benefit, not a drawback. And nobody knows that better than Twitter, where their 140-character constraint really created a whole new medium in a lot of ways.”
via Wired

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Tags : social media,    0 comments  
Jan 25, 2013

System automatically detects black ice on roads in real time

posted by Laura Domela

Finland’s VTT Technical Research Centre has developed a system for drivers that automatically detects black ice on roads.

Black-ice detection is based on a method developed by VTT, whereby changes in road conditions are detected in real time, based on data collected by the car’s own sensors.

‘The method entails estimating the difference in the speeds of the drive shaft and freely rotating axles in various driving situations, which enables deduction of the level of friction’, said senior scientist Kimmo Erkkilä in a statement.
via The Engineer

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Tags : automotive,    0 comments  
Jan 25, 2013

Storing information in DNA

posted by Laura Domela

Like all the best ideas, this one was born in a pub. Nick Goldman and Ewan Birney of the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) near Cambridge, were pondering what they could do with the torrent of genomic data their research group generates, all of which has to be archived.

The volume of data is growing faster than the capacity of the hard drives used to hold it. “That means the cost of storage is rising, but our budgets are not,” says Dr Goldman. Over a few beers, the pair began wondering if artificially constructed DNA might be one way to store the data torrent generated by the natural stuff. After a few more drinks and much scribbling on beer mats, what started out as a bit of amusing speculation had turned into the bones of a workable scheme. After some fleshing out and a successful test run, the full details were published this week in Nature.

The idea is not new. DNA is, after all, already used to store information in the form of genomes by every living organism on Earth. Its prowess at that job is the reason that information scientists have been trying to co-opt it for their own uses. But this has not been without problems.
via The Economist

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Tags : science, data,    0 comments  
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