Aug 22, 2014

A clever app that lets you make music with shapes

posted by Larra Morris

GeometricMusic_def-660x440.jpg

If you’ve always dreamed of making music but can barely tell the difference between a treble clef and an ampersand, all is not lost. A new app, called Geometric Music, requires no real musical skill beyond making sounds and understanding shapes...

The app works like ultra-simple sample-production software, allowing you to create layered beats. But while complex programs will drown you in buttons and knobs, Geometric Music only uses shapes to dictate how something sounds. Every noise you make is translated into one of four shapes (circle, triangle, square or hexagon), and you manipulate those shapes to change the rhythm, speed and volume. Think of it as tapping into a digitally-enabled form of shaped-based synesthesia.
via Wired

Continue reading 

Image: Geometric Music

Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 22, 2014

Graphene-treated rubber bands used as inexpensive body motion sensors

posted by Larra Morris

graphenerubberbands.jpg

Graphene is a cutting-edge wonder material, used in applications ranging from solar cells to supercapacitors. Rubber bands, on the other hand ... well, they're not so high-tech. By combining the one with the other, however, scientists have created ultra-cheap body motion sensors that could make a big difference in the field of health care.

The researchers, from the University of Surrey and Trinity College Dublin, have infused regular rubber bands with graphene. The treated bands remain stretchy, but thanks to the graphene, they're also electrically conductive. If they're wired up to a power source and then stretched – as the result of even a subtle movement – there's a very detectable effect on the current flowing through them.
via Gizmag

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 22, 2014

California requires manual controls before Google's self-driving car hits public roads

posted by Larra Morris

google-car-prototype-pic.jpg

One of the unique features inside Google's self-driving car is that it doesn't sport a steering wheel or a set of pedals. That won't fly on public roads in California though, so the folks in Mountain View are faced with adding them or sticking to closed-course testing. New regulations that go into effect next month require autonomous vehicles to let the driver take "immediate physical control" should the need arise. Google says it'll adhere to the rule by installing a temporary steering wheel and pedals in its 100 prototype cars set to begin testing on private roads in September.
via Engadget

Continue reading

Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 22, 2014

Ikea showrooms are being listed on Australian Airbnb

posted by Larra Morris

ojhg611ehje4kyv2ezn4.png

Most kids want to stay overnight at the museum of planetarium. But certain weirdos, like me, always wanted to sleep over at Ikea, amongst the endless rows of futons and 99 cent Swedish doo-dads. Now, we're getting our chance, thanks to an Airbnb promo with Ikea that will rent out beds overnight.

Just one problem (unless you're an Aussie): The participating Ikeas are in Australia. In both Perth and Sydney, Ikea will give groups a chance to rent out sections of its "sets" for the night, in a partnership headed up by Airbnb. There won't be any charge, save a $12 admin fee on Airbnb's side, and according to The Sydney Morning Herald, everyone gets to walk away with the whimsically Nordic sheets they slept on. Plus, free Ikea breakfast, which is the greatest gift of all.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading 

 
 Image: David/CC 
Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 22, 2014

Now computers can guess your emotional state with 87% accuracy

posted by Larra Morris

20140821_123930-640x400.jpg

A paper titled “Identifying emotion by keystroke dynamics and text pattern analysis” published in the journal Behavior & Information Technology outlines software designed by A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and colleagues that can recognize the emotional state of a human user with up to 87% accuracy.

The study described in the paper asked volunteers to type pre-determined text and note their emotional state at the time. They also made notes of their emotional state during times when they could type freely. By studying the keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis of what the subjects typed, the software tried to parse out how they were feeling out of seven options; joy, fear, anger, sadness, disgust, shame, and Sneezy guilt.
via The Mary Sue

Continue reading

Image: 

Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 21, 2014

Monkey’s selfie cannot be copyrighted, US regulators say

posted by Laura Domela

monkeyselfie.png

United States copyright regulators are agreeing with Wikipedia's conclusion that a monkey's selfie cannot be copyrighted by a nature photographer whose camera was swiped by the ape in the jungle. The animal's selfie went viral.

The US Copyright Office, in a 1,222-page report discussing federal copyright law, said that a "photograph taken by a monkey" is unprotected intellectual property.

"The Office will not register works produced by nature, animals, or plants. Likewise, the Office cannot register a work purportedly created by divine or supernatural beings, although the Office may register a work where the application or the deposit copy state that the work was inspired by a divine spirit," said the draft report, "Compendium of US Copyright Office Practices, Third Edition."
via ars technica

Continue reading 

Aug 21, 2014

Uh-oh: solar energy plant setting birds on fire in midair

posted by Laura Domela

A BrightSource solar energy farm in the Mojave Desert of California is under fire *pats myself on the back* after it's been discovered that thousands of birds have been set aflame from the farm's 300,000 focused mirrors. Wow, I feel like that's poor planning. Or, sadly and much more likely, not-giving-a-shit planning.

More than 300,000 mirrors, each the size of a garage door, reflect solar rays onto three boiler towers each looming up to 40 stories high. The water inside is heated to produce steam, which turns turbines that generate enough electricity for 140,000 homes.

via Geekosystem

Continue reading

Tags : solar, oops,    0 comments  
Aug 21, 2014

Scientists developing remote-control cyborg moths

posted by Larra Morris

mothbiobots.jpg

Led by Dr. Alper Bozkurt, the NCSU team has been working with moths suspended in a rig that holds them in place while they fly, but still allows them to turn to either side. As the moths make those turns, implanted electrodes monitor the electrical signals sent by their brains to their flight muscles – those electrodes are first implanted when the moth is in its pupal stage, so they've grown right into its body by the time it emerges from the cocoon as an adult.

Using this setup, the researchers have been able to determine which signals are responsible for which flight maneuvers. They're now working on a way of transmitting those signals to the moths as they're in flight, so that they could be "steered" by a remotely-located human operator.
via Gizmag

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 21, 2014

Alzheimer's patients will be injected with the blood of young people

posted by Larra Morris

loekzvunegidpfrsqss1.jpg

It's not often that science confirms ideas straight out of vampire lore, but here you have one: aspate of studies in mice have found that infusions of young blood seem to reverse aging. So now we're moving to the next logical step: giving the blood of young humans to Alzheimer's patients.

The first very human trials testing the effect of young blood will start in October at the Stanford School of Medicine. Patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's will receive blood plasma donated by volunteers 30 or younger. Despite vampiric-sounding premise, approval for human trials were quite easy to get, the study's head Tony Wyss-Coray tells New Scientist. After all, we've been giving blood transfusions for long time—just without studying all the health effects.
via Gizmodo

Continue reading 

Tags :    0 comments  
Aug 21, 2014

Brazilian architect Guto Requena 3D-prints unique shapes based on participants' emotions

posted by Larra Morris

sao-paulo-design-week-love-project-1-thumb-620x348-88847.jpg

Brazilian architect Guto Requena launched a project that is very close to his heart at Design Weekend São Paulo. Through a special software developed by D3 Studio, personal emotions are captured to define new shapes for everyday objects. "The Love Project is a study in design, science and technology that captures the emotions people feel in relating personal love stories and transforms them into useful objects. The project suggests a future in which unique products will bear personal histories in ways that encourage long life-cycles, thus inherently combining deeply meaningful works with sustainable design," Requena writes on his website.

The design process is peculiar and involves three stages. First, three sensors are applied to the users in order to read their sudden reactions while they tell a love story that defined their lives. "Participants are isolated during this process so that they can more intimately expose their feelings and that data can be more accurately captured," Requena further explains. As users speak, data drawn from their changing emotion is captured by a software specially created for this. This data turns into a special design, that is then printed using a 3D printer.
via Cool Hunting

sao-paulo-design-week-love-project-4-thumb-620x348-88853.jpg

Continue reading

Images: Studio Guto Requena

Tags :    0 comments  
Get this feed  
« Previous123456...528Next »

Login Required

In order to view this resource, you must log in to our site. Please sign in now.

If you don't already have an acount with us, registering is free and quick. Register now.

Sign In    Register